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history of s'mores

history of s'mores

This National S’mores Day, we’re reflecting back on the history of s’mores and giving thanks to the creator of our favorite summertime treat.

The marshmallow and chocolate flavor combination that has stolen our hearts actually dates back to the Victorian era, where it could be found in funeral cakes of the day. But the more ooey, gooey marshmallow that we expect atop our s’mores didn’t come around until later in the era, around the 1890s. Summer destination towns in New Jersey and the Northeast began the cozy tradition of roasting the marshmallows around a fire in groups, and was especially popular with younger crowds having some summer fun.

However, it wasn’t until 40 years later in 1927 that the s’more treat we all know and love today was introduced by troop leader Loretta Scott Crew of the Girl Scouts. Her recipe was first published among other simple campfire eats in a Girl Scout Guidebook titled “Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts” under it’s original name “Some More.” Since the treat was meant to feed 16 scouts, you can guess where the name came from.

The recipe calls for 8 sticks (for roasting), 16 graham crackers, 8 bars of plain chocolate broken in two, and 16 marshmallows. It instructs scouts to “toast two marshmallows over the coals to a crisp gooey state and then put them inside a graham cracker and chocolate bar sandwich.” It goes on to say that “the heat of the marshmallow between the halves of chocolate bar will melt the chocolate a bit. Though it tastes like “Some More,” one is really enough.” we're not sure we agree with that last bit!

Here at chuao, we are passionate about s’mores and have been working hard to craft the perfect s'more. We’re finally ready to share the ooey, gooey results via our s’more joy kit. featuring 16 of our mini bars, 12 vegan dandies marshmallows, and 24 gourmet firehook graham crackers, all you'll need to do is gather around the fire and get toasting.⁠

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